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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on Today at 09:54:11 AM »
August 23 , 2014

Decision-making

“Before we got clean, most of our actions were guided by impulse.  Today, we are not locked into this type of thinking.”

Basic Text, p. 90

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Life is a series of decisions, actions, and consequences.  When we were using, our decisions were usually driven by our disease, resulting in self-destructive actions and dire consequences.  We came to see decision-making as a rigged game, one we should play as little as possible.

Given that, many of us have great difficulty learning to make decisions in recovery.  Slowly, by working the Twelve Steps, we gain practice in making healthy decisions, ones that give positive results.  Where our disease once affected our will and our lives, we ask our Higher Power to care for us.  We inventory our values and our actions, check our findings with someone we trust, and ask the God of our understanding to remove our shortcomings.  In working the steps we gain freedom from the influence of our disease, and we learn principles of decision-making that can guide us in all our affairs.

Today, our decisions and their consequences need not be influenced by our disease.  Our faith gives us the courage and direction to make good decisions and the strength to act on them.  The result of that kind of decision-making is a life worth living.

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Just for today:  I will use the principles of the Twelve Steps to make healthy decisions.  I will ask my Higher Power for the strength to act on those decisions.

Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on Today at 09:53:13 AM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote     8/23/14


The birth of resentment is blame. Often from the center of your bad feelings you seek someone to blame and yet if you 'find' this someone, it can only serve to increase your misery. Blame increases misery because it gives you something to focus on again and again. 'Resentment' is from Latin, meaning to 'feel again.'

By eliminating blame, I don't allow 'them to live rent free in my head
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on Today at 09:52:16 AM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day      August 23 , 2014
"They also learned, and perhaps this was the most important thing, how to look at things through the eyes of the Higher Powers."   
--Fools Crow, LAKOTA
Our eyes can only see our beliefs. Our beliefs cause us to make assumptions, draw conclusions, and cause confusion. Our five senses are very limiting. The Creator has a way of allowing us to see or know in the spiritual world. This is called the Sixth Sense. The Sixth Sense is like a radar system; our personal radar system. It will help us "see" opportunities and help us avoid disaster. This Sixth Sense is controlled by God. We must learn to listen to it. We must learn to trust it. We must learn to act on it even if our head says differently. We must learn to look at things through the eyes of God.
My Creator, guide me today. If my eyes cause confusion, let me close them and see through Your eyes. If my ears hear confusion, let me listen to my heart. Let me let You guide me.
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Saturday, August 23, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Self Care

When will we become lovable? When will we feel safe? When will we get all the protection, nurturing, and love we so richly deserve? We will get it when we begin giving it to ourselves.
  —Beyond Codependency

The idea of giving ourselves what we want and need can be confusing, especially if we have spent many years not knowing that it's okay to take care of ourselves. Taking our energy and focus off others and their responsibilities and placing that energy on to our responsibilities and ourselves is a recovery behavior that can be acquired. We learn it by daily practice.

We begin by relaxing, by breathing deeply, and letting go of our fears enough to feel as peaceful as we can. Then, we ask ourselves: What do I need to do to take care of myself today, or for this moment?

What do I need and want to do?

What would demonstrate love and self-responsibility?

Am I caught up in the belief that others are responsible for making me happy, responsible for me? Then the first thing I need to do is correct my belief system. I am responsible for myself.

Do I feel anxious and concerned about a responsibility I've been neglecting? Then perhaps I need to let go of my fears and tend to that responsibility.

Do I feel overwhelmed, out of control? Maybe I need to journey back to the first of the Twelve Steps.

Have I been working too hard? Maybe what I need to do is take some time off and do something fun.

Have I been neglecting my work on daily tasks? Then maybe what I need to do is get back to my routine.

There is no recipe, no formula, no guidebook for self care. We each have a guide, and that guide is within us. We need to ask the question: What do I need to do to take loving, responsible care of myself? Then, we need to listen to the answer. Self-care is not that difficult. The most challenging part is trusting the answer, and having the courage to follow through once we hear it.

Today, I will focus on taking care of myself. I will trust myself and my Higher Power to guide me in this process.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on August 22, 2014, 11:37:58 AM »

August 22 , 2014

Contribution

“We recognize our spiritual growth when we are able to reach out and help others.”

Basic Text, p. 58

––––=––––

To make a difference in the world, to contribute something special, is perhaps the highest aspiration of the human heart.  Each one of us, no matter what our personal makeup, has a unique quality to offer.

Chances are that at some time in our recovery we met someone who reached us when no one else could.  Whether it was someone who made us laugh at our first meeting, a warm and compassionate sponsor, or an understanding friend who supported us through an emotional storm, that person made all the difference in the world.

All of us have had the gift of recovery shared with us by another recovering addict.  For that, we are grateful.  We express our gratitude by sharing freely with others what was given to us.  The individual message we carry may help a newcomer only we can reach.

There are many ways to serve our fellowship.  Each of us will find that we do some things better than others, but all service work is equally important.  If we are willing to serve, we’re sure to find that particular way to contribute that’s right for us.

––––=––––

Just for today:  My contribution makes a difference.  I will offer a helping hand today.

Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on August 22, 2014, 11:36:54 AM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote     8/22/14


Embrace all of your emotions for they are what make you, you. 'Hold them in an embrace of total acceptance and in that embrace you will not be agonized any more. Do you think the Christ never cried? Do you think the Buddha never ached? You are not going to be less human, you are going to be wholly human.' ~Bartholomew, I Come as a Brother

I become one with myself by embracing all of me, because I am all of me and I won't be less!
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on August 22, 2014, 11:35:53 AM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day     August 22 , 2014
"When life is too good, we think too highly of ourselves and our blessings. Then we decide we are the wisest and the favored ones, and we don't think we need Wakan-Tanka and the Helpers anymore."   
--Fools Crow, LAKOTA
It is sometimes easy to get off track when times are good. We start to take the credit and start to think we are in control. We start to think we are smart. Then we quit praying or pray only with lip service. We say the words but don't mean them. Sometimes our head is our greatest enemy. We start acting like a foolish child. We must develop the discipline to be humble during the good times. We need to remember how honorable it is each day to come into the presence of the Creator. How happy we should be to talk to the Grandfathers, to have the choice to start each day on the Sacred Spot - our place of communion with the Great Spirit.
Oh Great Spirit, first let me thank You for the honor of talking to You today. To have the insight of Your love, that only You can love me when I don't deserve to be loved. Let me be reminded to talk to You all day long.

 
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Friday, August 22, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Responsibility for Family Members

I can still remember my mother clutching her heart, threatening to have a heart attack and die, and blaming it on me.
  —Anonymous

For some of us, the idea that we were responsible for other people's feelings had its roots in childhood and was established by members of our nuclear family. We may have been told that we made our mother or father miserable, leading directly to the idea that we were also responsible for making them happy. The idea that we are responsible for our parents' happiness or misery can instill exaggerated feelings of power and guilt in us.

We do not have this kind of power over our parents - over their feelings, or over the course of their lives. We do not have to allow them to have this kind of power over us.

Our parents did the best they could. But we still do not have to accept one belief from them that is not a healthy belief. They may be our parents, but they are not always right. They may be our parents, but their beliefs and behaviors are not always healthy and in our best interest.

We are free to examine and choose our beliefs.

Let go of guilt. Let go of excessive and inappropriate feelings of responsibility toward parents and other family members. We do not have to allow their destructive beliefs to control our feelings, our behaviors, our life, or us.

Today, I will begin the process of setting myself free from any self-defeating beliefs my parents passed on to me. I will strive for appropriate ideas and boundaries concerning how much power and how much responsibility I can actually have in my relationship with my parents.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on August 21, 2014, 11:46:50 AM »

August 21 , 2014

Friendships

“Our friendships become deep, and we experience the warmth and caring which results from addicts sharing recovery and a new life.”

IP No. 19, Self-Acceptance

––––=––––

Most of us come to Narcotics Anonymous with few genuine friends.  And most of us arrive without the slightest understanding of what it takes to build lasting friendships.  Over time, though, we learn that friendships require work.  At one time or another, all friendships are challenging.  Like any relationship, friendship is a learning process.

Our friends love us enough to tell us the truth about ourselves.  The old saying, “The truth will set you free, but first it will make you furious,” seems especially true in friendship.  This can make friendships awkward.  We may find ourselves avoiding certain meetings rather than facing our friends.  We have found, though, that friends speak out of concern for us.  They want the best for us.  Our friends accept us despite our shortcomings.  They understand that we are still a work in progress.

Friends are there for us when we’re not there for ourselves.  Friends help us gain valuable perspective on the events in our lives and our recovery.  It is important that we actively cultivate friendships, for we have learned that we cannot recover alone.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will be grateful for the friends I have.  I will take an active part in my friendships.

Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on August 21, 2014, 11:46:01 AM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote     8/21/14


Do it right the first time. If you don't have the time to do something right, when will you have the time to do it over?

It takes less time for me to do something right, than to explain to my sponsor why I did it wrong.
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