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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 18, 2014, 02:00:38 PM »

December 18 , 2014

The message of our meetings

“The fact that we, each and every group, focus on carrying the message provides consistency; addicts can count on us.”

Basic Text, p. 68

––––=––––

Tales of our antics in active addiction may be funny.  Stories of our old bizarre reactions to life when using may be interesting.  But they tend to carry the mess more than the message.  Philosophical arguments on the nature of God are fascinating.  Discussions of current controversies have their place—however, it’s not at an NA meeting.

Those times when we grow disgusted with meetings and find ourselves complaining that “they don’t know how to share” or “it was another whining session” are probably an indication that we need to take a good, hard look at how we share.

What we share about how we got into recovery and how we stayed here through practicing the Twelve Steps is the real message of recovery.  That’s what we are all looking for when we go to a meeting.  Our primary purpose is to carry the message to the still-suffering addict, and what we share at meetings can either contribute significantly to this effort or detract greatly.  The choice, and the responsibility, is ours.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will share my recovery at an NA meeting.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 18, 2014, 01:59:14 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote         12/18/14


Which 'isms' affect you? Alcoholism: Incredibly Short Memory. Egoism: I, Self, and Me. Recidivism: I Sponsor Myself. Narcissism: In Side Me. Pessimism: I Sabotage Myself. Optimism: Incredibly Spiritual Moments.

Which 'ism' do I adopt for my life?
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on December 18, 2014, 01:58:08 PM »
 , Elder's Meditation of the Day             December , 18 , 2014
"Parents have to demonstrate the value of trust, respect, and honor."   
--Haida Gwaii, Traditional Circle of Elders
Children learn more by watching than by listening. If we want our children to understand and value trust, they know it by watching how adults live their lives! If we want the children to be respectful, they will observe what the adults do and say to each other. We need to walk our talk. We need to remember the children are watching.
Grandfather, help me learn these important values: Trust, Respect, and Honor.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on December 18, 2014, 01:55:22 PM »
Thursday, December 18, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Staying Open to Our Feelings

Many of us have gotten so good at following the "don't feel" rule that we can try to talk ourselves out of having feelings, even in recovery.

"If I was really working a good program, I wouldn't feel angry."

"I don't get angry. I'm a Christian. I forgive and forget."

"I'm not angry. I'm affirming that I'm happy."

These are all statements, some of them quite clever, that indicate we're operating under the "don't feel" rule again.

Part of working a good program means acknowledging and dealing with our feelings. We strive to accept and deal with our anger so it doesn't harden into resentments. We don't use recovery as an excuse to shut down our emotions.

Yes, we are striving for forgiveness, but we still want to feel, listen to, and stay with our feelings until it is time to release them appropriately. Our Higher Power created the emotional part of ourselves. God is not telling us to not feel; it's our dysfunctional systems.

We also need to be careful how we use affirmations; discounting our emotions won't make feelings go away. If we're angry, it's okay to have that feeling. That's part of how we get and stay healthy.

Today, I will refuse to accept shame from others or myself for feeling my feelings.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 17, 2014, 04:25:09 PM »
December 17 , 2014

Service motives

“Everything that occurs in the course of NA service must be motivated by the desire to more successfully carry the message of recovery to the addict who still suffers.”

Basic Text, p. xxvi

––––=––––

Our motives are often a surprise to us.  In our early days of recovery, they were almost always a surprise!  We’ve learned to check our motives through prayer, meditation, the steps, and talking to our sponsor or other addicts.  When we find ourselves with an especially strong urge to do or have something, it’s particularly important to check our motives to find out what we really want.

In early recovery, many of us throw ourselves into service with great fervor before we have started the regular practice of motive-checking.  It takes awhile before we become aware of the real reasons for our zeal.  We may want to impress others, show off our talents, or be recognized and important.  Now, these desires may not be harmful in another setting, expressed through another outlet.  In NA service, however, they can do serious damage.

When we decide to serve NA, we make a decision to help addicts find and maintain recovery.  We have to carefully check our motives in service, remembering that it’s much easier to frighten away using addicts than to convince them to stay.  When we show them game-playing, manipulation, or pomposity, we present an unattractive picture of recovery.  However, the unselfish desire to serve others creates an atmosphere that is attractive to the addict who still suffers.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will check my motives for the true spirit of service.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 17, 2014, 04:23:48 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote          12/17/14


The law of physics says there is only one way to coast: down hill.

If I am not moving forward, I am moving backward. There is no coasting in recovery.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on December 17, 2014, 04:22:39 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day             December 17 ,2014
"Hear me! A single twig breaks, but the bundle of twigs is strong."   
--Tecumseh, SHAWNEE
You can take one arrow and break it in half. But if you take 12 arrows in a bundle, it's almost impossible to break any of them. There is strength in Unity. When we are together we are very powerful. This is the way the ancestors told us we need to be. Strong. We need to unite ourselves. This is why the Elders say, when we make decisions, we must first consider the good of the people. If every person in the community thinks this way, then we will always make strong decisions.
Creator, let my decisions have the strength of the bundle.

 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on December 17, 2014, 04:21:03 PM »
Wednesday, December 17, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Nurturing Ourselves

Many of us have been so deprived of nurturing that we think it's silly or self-indulgent. Nurturing is neither silly nor self-indulgent; it's how we show love for ourselves. That's what we're striving for in recovery - a loving relationship with ourselves that works, so we can have loving relationships with others that work.

When we hurt, we ask ourselves what we need to help us feel better. When we feel alone, we reach out to someone safe. Without feeling that we are a burden, we allow that person to be there for us.

We rest when we're tired; eat when we're hungry; have fun or relax when our spirits need a lift. Nurturing means giving ourselves gifts - a trip to the beauty salon or barbershop, a massage, a book, a new jacket, or a new suit or dress. It means a long, hot bath to forget about our problems and the world for a few moments when that would feel good.

We learn to be gentle with ourselves and to open up to the nurturing that others have to offer us.

As part of nurturing ourselves, we allow ourselves to give and receive positive touch - touch that feels appropriate to us, touch that is safe. We reject touch that doesn't feel good or safe and is not positive.

We learn to give ourselves what we need in a gentle, loving, compassionate way. We do this with the understanding it will not make us lazy, spoiled, self centered, or narcissistic. Nurtured people are effective in their work and in their relationships.

We will learn to feel loved by ourselves so much that we can truly love others and let them love us.

Today, I will nurture myself. I will also be open to the nurturing that I can give to others and receive from them.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 16, 2014, 05:48:12 PM »
December 16 , 2014

Where there’s smoke...

“Complacency is the enemy of members with substantial clean time.  If we remain complacent for long, the recovery process ceases.”

Basic Text, p. 84

––––=––––

Recognizing complacency in our recovery is like seeing smoke in a room.  The “smoke” thickens when our meeting attendance drops, contact with newcomers decreases, or relations with our sponsor aren’t maintained.  With continued complacency, we won’t be able to see through the smoke to find our way out.  Only our immediate response will prevent an inferno.

We must learn to recognize the smoke of complacency.  In NA, we have all the help we need to do that.  We need to spend time with other recovering addicts because they may detect our complacency before we do.  Newcomers will remind us of how painful active addiction can be.  Our sponsor will help us remain focused, and recovery literature kept in easy reach can be used to extinguish the small flare-ups that happen from time to time.  Regular participation in our recovery will surely enable us to see that wisp of smoke long before it becomes a major inferno.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will participate in the full range of my recovery.  My commitment to NA is just as strong today as it was in the beginning of my recovery.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 16, 2014, 05:45:25 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote       12/16/14


Some of us change when we see the light, most of us change when we feel the heat. Are you waiting to get burned before you do what you need to?

If I don't change... my clean and sober date will.
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