Recent Posts

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21
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on May 07, 2015, 01:21:14 PM »
May 7  , 2015

Turning turmoil into peace

“With the world in such a turmoil, I feel I have been blessed to be where I am.”

Basic Text, p. 145

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Some days it doesn’t pay to turn on the news, we hear so many stories about violence and mayhem.  When we used, many of us grew accustomed to violence.  Through the fog of our addiction, we rarely got too disturbed by the state of the world.  When we are clean, however, many of us find we are particularly sensitive to the world around us.  As recovering people, what can we do to make it a better place?

When we find ourselves disturbed by the turmoil of our world, we can find comfort in prayer and meditation.  When it seems like everything is turned upside down, our contact with our Higher Power can be our calm in the midst of any storm.  When we are centered on our spiritual path, we can respond to our fears with peace.  And by living peaceably ourselves, we invite a spirit of peace to enter our world.  As recovering people, we can affect positive change by doing our best to practice the principles of our program.

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Just for today:  I will enhance peace in the world by living, speaking, and acting peacefully in my own life.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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22
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on May 06, 2015, 05:56:00 PM »
May 6 , 2015

Are we having fun yet?

“In time, we can relax and enjoy the atmosphere of recovery.”

Basic Text, p. 56

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Imagine what would happen if a newcomer walked into one of our meetings and was met by a group of grim-faced people gripping the arms of their chairs with white knuckles.  That newcomer would probably bolt, perhaps muttering, “I thought I could get off drugs and be happy.”

Thankfully, our newcomers are usually met by a group of friendly, smiling folks who are obviously fairly content with the lives they’ve found in Narcotics Anonymous.  What an enormous amount of hope this provides!  A newcomer, whose life has been deadly serious, is strongly attracted by an atmosphere of laughter and relaxation.  Coming from a place where everything is taken seriously, where disaster always waits around the next corner, it’s a welcome relief to enter a room and find people who generally don’t take themselves too seriously, who are ready for something wonderful.

We learn to lighten up in recovery.  We laugh at the absurdity of our addiction.  Our meetings—those rooms filled with the lively, happy sounds of percolating coffee, clattering chairs, and laughing addicts—are the gathering places where we first welcome our newcomers and let them know that, yes, we’re having fun now.

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Just for today:  I can laugh at myself.  I can take a joke.  I will lighten up and have some fun today.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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23
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on May 05, 2015, 01:39:06 PM »

May 5 , 2015

Any lengths

“...I was ready to go to any lengths to stay clean.”

Basic Text, p. 132

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“Any lengths?” newcomers ask.  “What do you mean, any lengths?”  Looking back at our active addiction and the lengths we were willing to go to in order to stay high can help to explain.  Were we willing to drive many miles to get drugs?  Yes, we usually were.  Then it makes sense that, if we are as concerned about staying clean as we were about using, we will try anything to find a ride to a meeting.

In our addiction, didn’t we often do crazy, insane things or use unknown substances at the direction of others?  Then why do we often find it so hard to take direction in recovery, especially when the direction is designed to help us grow?  And when we used, didn’t we often, in desperation, turn to our Higher Power, saying, “Please, just get me out of this one!”  Then why do we find it so hard to ask for God’s help in our recovery?

When we used, we usually had an open mind when it came to finding ways and means to get more drugs.  If we can apply this same principle of open-mindedness to our recovery, we may surprise ourselves by how easily we begin to grasp the NA program.  Our best thinking, it is often said, got us into the rooms of Narcotics Anonymous.  If we are willing to go to any lengths, follow directions, and stay open-minded, we can stay clean.

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Just for today:  I am willing to go to any lengths to stay clean.  I will become as open-minded and ready to take direction as I need to be.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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24
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on May 04, 2015, 12:14:26 PM »
May 4 , 2015

What about the newcomer?

“Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry the message to the addict who still suffers.”

Tradition Five

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Our home group means a lot to us.  After all, where would we be without our favorite NA meeting?  Our group sometimes sponsors picnics or other activities.  Often, home group members get together to see a movie or go bowling.  We have all made good friendships through our home group, and we wouldn’t trade that warmth for the world.

But sometimes we must take inventory of what our group is doing to fulfill its primary purpose—to carry the message to the still-suffering addict.  Sometimes when we go to our meetings, we know almost everyone and get caught up in the laughter and fun.  But what about the newcomer?  Have we remembered to reach out to the new people who may be sitting by themselves, lonely and frightened?  Do we remember to welcome those visiting our group?

The love found in the rooms of Narcotics Anonymous helps us recover from addiction.  But once we have gotten clean, we must remember to give to others what was so freely given to us.  We need to reach out to the addict who still suffers.  After all, “the newcomer is the most important person at any meeting.”

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Just for today:  I’m grateful for the warm fellowship I’ve found in my home group.  I will reach out my hand to the still-suffering addict, offering that same fellowship to others.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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25
Newcomer / Re: Am I an addict?
« Last post by Monkey on May 04, 2015, 12:55:14 AM »
should be a click on and it opens
26
Newcomer / Re: Acceptance
« Last post by glennandina on May 02, 2015, 11:13:46 PM »
I'm learning all this every day and to let go of the guilt I feel for loosing my kids to cps because of my poor choices and I failed to protect them from everyone that hurt me.
27
Newcomer / Re: What Drugs Can Do
« Last post by glennandina on May 02, 2015, 11:03:49 PM »
Well said when my husband came home he sent me  a letter saying goodbye to his drug of choice meth.we're both recovering meth addicts.here's some thing I wrote.
Goodbye to meth
I won't miss you when your fine
I've done you for so long
You took a hold of my life
Made me feel like I was married to you and my husband.
I wasn't sad to see you go.
There's more to life than holding on to that glass pipe.
You sucked me in for a while
But then when I blew you out that last time I said goodbye for good.
28
Newcomer / Re: Am I an addict?
« Last post by glennandina on May 02, 2015, 10:54:35 PM »
Can't open this file so I can read it.
29
Newcomer / Re: NA Literature
« Last post by glennandina on May 02, 2015, 10:47:26 PM »
Hello new here
30
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on May 02, 2015, 08:37:42 PM »

May 2 , 2015

Just maybe...

“There is one thing more than anything else that will defeat us in our recovery; this is an attitude of indifference or intolerance toward spiritual principles.”

Basic Text, p. 18

––––=––––

When we first came to NA, many of us had great difficulty accepting the spiritual principles underlying this program—and for good reason.  No matter how we’d tried to control our addiction, we’d found ourselves powerless.  We grew angry and frustrated with anyone who suggested there was hope for us, because we knew better.  Spiritual ideas may have had some bearing on other peoples’ lives, but not on ours.

Despite our indifference or intolerance toward spiritual principles, we were drawn to Narcotics Anonymous.  There, we met other addicts.  They’d been where we’d been, powerless and hopeless, yet they’d found a way not only to stop using but to live and enjoy life clean.  They spoke of the spiritual principles that had pointed the way for them to this new life of recovery.  For them, these principles were not just theories but a part of their practical experience.  Yes, we had good reason to be skeptical, but these spiritual principles spoken of by other NA members really seemed to work.

Once we admitted this, we didn’t necessarily accept every single spiritual idea we heard.  But we did start to think that, if these principles had worked for others, just maybe they’d work for us, too.  For a beginning, that willingness was enough.

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Just for today:  Just maybe the spiritual principles I hear spoken of in NA might work for me.  I am willing, at least, to open my mind to the possibility.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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