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21
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on February 19, 2015, 04:29:51 PM »
February 19 ,2015

Reservations

“Relapse is never an accident.  Relapse is a sign that we have a reservation in our program.”

Basic Text, p. 79

––––=––––

A reservation is something we set aside for future use.  In our case, a reservation is the expectation that, if such-and-such happens, we will surely relapse.  What event do we expect will be too painful to bear?  Maybe we think that if a spouse or lover leaves us, we will have to get high.  If we lose our job, surely, we think, we will use.  Or maybe it’s the death of a loved one that we expect to be unbearable.  In any case, the reservations we harbor give us permission to use when they come true—as they often do.

We can prepare ourselves for success instead of relapse by examining our expectations and altering them where we can.  Most of us carry within us a catalog of anticipated misery closely related to our fears.  We can learn how to survive pain by watching other members live through similar pain.  We can apply their lessons to our own expectations.  Instead of telling ourselves we will have to get high if this happens, we can quietly reassure ourselves that we, too, can stay clean through whatever life brings us today.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will check for any reservations that may endanger my recovery and share them with another addict.

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Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
22
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on February 19, 2015, 04:05:26 PM »
February 19 ,2015

Reservations

“Relapse is never an accident.  Relapse is a sign that we have a reservation in our program.”

Basic Text, p. 79

––––=––––

A reservation is something we set aside for future use.  In our case, a reservation is the expectation that, if such-and-such happens, we will surely relapse.  What event do we expect will be too painful to bear?  Maybe we think that if a spouse or lover leaves us, we will have to get high.  If we lose our job, surely, we think, we will use.  Or maybe it’s the death of a loved one that we expect to be unbearable.  In any case, the reservations we harbor give us permission to use when they come true—as they often do.

We can prepare ourselves for success instead of relapse by examining our expectations and altering them where we can.  Most of us carry within us a catalog of anticipated misery closely related to our fears.  We can learn how to survive pain by watching other members live through similar pain.  We can apply their lessons to our own expectations.  Instead of telling ourselves we will have to get high if this happens, we can quietly reassure ourselves that we, too, can stay clean through whatever life brings us today.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will check for any reservations that may endanger my recovery and share them with another addict.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
23
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on February 19, 2015, 04:04:09 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote      2/19/15


Half measures do not avail us half, they avail us nothing.

Am I willing to go to any length?
24
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on February 19, 2015, 04:03:07 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day        February 19 , 2015
The Old Man said,`you are both ugly and handsome and you must accept your ugliness as well as your handsomeness in order to really accept yourself."   
--Larry P. Aitken, CHIPPEWA
My Grandfather told me one time that any person who is judgmental to another is also judgmental to themselves. If we want to be free of being judgmental, we need to first work on how judgmental we are to ourselves. If we quit judging ourselves and start accepting ourselves as we are, we will start accepting others as they are. Then we will experience a level of new freedom.
Great Spirit, let me accept myself as I am - honoring both my strengths and my weaknesses.
25
Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on February 19, 2015, 04:01:32 PM »
Thursday, February 19, 2015
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Our Path

I just spent several hours with someone from my group, and I feel like I'm losing my mind. This woman insisted that the only way I would make progress in my program was to go to her church and succumb to her religious rules. She pushed and insisted, and insisted and pushed. She's been in the program so much longer than I have. I kept thinking that she must know what she's talking about. But it didn't feel right. And now I feel crazy, afraid, guilty, and ashamed.
—Anonymous

The spiritual path and growth promised to us by the Twelve Steps does not depend on any religious belief. They are not contingent upon any denomination or sect. They are not, as the traditions of Twelve Step programs state, affiliated with any religious denomination or organization.

We do not have to allow anyone to badger us about religion in recovery. We do not have to allow people to make us feel ashamed, afraid, or less than because we do not subscribe to their beliefs about religion.

We do not have to let them do it to us in the name of God, love, or recovery.

The spiritual experience we will find as a result of recovery and the Twelve Steps will be our own spiritual experience. It will be a relationship with God, a Higher Power, as we understand God.

Each of us must find our own spiritual path. Each of us must build our own relationship with God, as we understand God. Each of us needs a Power greater than ourselves. These concepts are critical to recovery.

So is the freedom to choose how to do that.

Higher Power, help me know that I don't have to allow anyone to shame or badger me into religious beliefs. If they confuse that with the spirituality available in recovery, help me give their issue back to them. Help me discover and develop my own spirituality, a path that works for me. Guide me, with Divine Wisdom, as I grow spiritually.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
26
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on February 18, 2015, 04:28:08 PM »

February 18 , 2015

The recovery partnership

“As long as I take it easy and make a commitment with my Higher Power to do the best I can, I know I will be taken care of today.”

––––=––––

Many of us feel that our fundamental commitment in recovery is to our Higher Power.  Knowing that we lack the power to stay clean and find recovery on our own, we enter into a partnership with a Power greater than we are.  We make a commitment to live in the care of our Higher Power and, in return, our Higher Power guides us.

This partnership is vital to staying clean.  Making it through the early days of recovery often feels like the hardest thing we’ve ever done.  But the strength of our commitment to recovery and the power of God’s care is sufficient to carry us through, just for today.

Our part in this partnership is to do the very best we can each day, showing up for life and doing what’s put in front of us, applying the principles of recovery to the best of our ability.  We promise to do the best we can—not to fake it, not to pretend to be superhuman, but simply to do the footwork of recovery.  In fulfilling our part of the recovery partnership, we experience the care our Higher Power has provided us.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will honor my commitment to a partnership with my Higher Power.

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Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
27
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on February 18, 2015, 04:27:02 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote      2/18/15


When you are in the wrong place, the right place is empty.

Do I know my rightful place in recovery?
28
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on February 18, 2015, 04:25:17 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day         February 18   ,2015
"Laughter is a necessity in life that does not cost much, and the Old Ones say that one of the greatest healing powers in our life is the ability to laugh."   
--Larry P. Aitken, CHIPPEWA
Laughter is a good stress eliminator. Laughter causes healing powers to be distributed through our bodies. Laughter helps heal relationships that are having problems. Laughter can change other people. Laughter can heal the sick. Laughter is spiritual. One of the greatest gifts among Indian people has been our ability to laugh. Humor is natural to Indian people. Sometimes the only thing left to do is laugh.
Great Spirit, allow me to laugh when times get tough.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on February 18, 2015, 04:23:48 PM »
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Being Right

Recovery is not about being right; it's about allowing ourselves to be who we are and accepting others as they are.

That concept can be difficult for many of us if we have lived in systems that functioned on the "right/wrong" justice scale. The person who was right was okay; the person who was wrong was shamed. All value and worth may have depended on being right; to be wrong meant annihilation of self and self-esteem.

In recovery, we are learning how to strive for love in our relationships, not superiority. Yes, we may need to make decisions about people's behavior from time to time. If someone is hurting us, we need to stand up for ourselves. We have a responsibility to set boundaries and take care of ourselves. But we do not need to justify taking care of ourselves by condemning someone else. We can avoid the trap of focusing on others instead of ourselves.

In recovery, we are learning that what we do needs to be right only for us. What others do is their business and needs to be right only for them. It's tempting to rest in the superiority of being right and in analyzing other people's motives and actions, but it's more rewarding to look deeper.

Today, I will remember that I don't have to hide behind being right. I don't have to justify what I want and need with saying something is "right" or "wrong." I can let myself be who I am.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
30
Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on February 17, 2015, 03:18:32 PM »
February 17 , 2015

Carrying the message, not the addict

“They can be analyzed, counseled, reasoned with, prayed over, threatened, beaten, or locked up, but they will not stop until they want to stop.”

Basic Text, p. 65

––––=––––

Perhaps one of the most difficult truths we must face in our recovery is that we are as powerless over another’s addiction as we are over our own.  We may think that because we’ve had a spiritual awakening in our own lives we should be able to persuade another addict to find recovery.  But there are limits to what we can do to help another addict.

We cannot force them to stop using.  We cannot give them the results of the steps or grow for them.  We cannot take away their loneliness or their pain.  There is nothing we can say to convince a scared addict to surrender the familiar misery of addiction for the frightening uncertainty of recovery.  We cannot jump inside other peoples’ skins, shift their goals, or decide for them what is best for them.

However, if we refuse to try to exert this power over another’s addiction, we may help them.  They may grow if we allow them to face reality, painful though it may be.  They may become more productive, by their own definition, as long as we don’t try and do it for them.  They can become the authority on their own lives, provided we are only authorities on our own.  If we can accept all this, we can become what we were meant to be—carriers of the message, not the addict.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will accept that I am powerless not only over my own addiction but also over everyone else’s.  I will carry the message, not the addict.

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Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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