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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 14, 2014, 01:50:10 PM »

December 14 , 2014

Addiction, drugs, and recovery

“Addiction is a physical, mental, and spiritual disease that affects every area of our lives.”

Basic Text, p. 20

––––=––––

Before we started using, most of us had a stereotype, a mental image of what addicts were supposed to look like.  Some of us pictured a junkie robbing convenience markets for drug money.  Others imagined a paranoid recluse peering at life from behind perpetually drawn drapes and locked doors.  As long as we didn’t fit any of the stereotypes, we thought, we couldn’t be addicts.

As our using progressed, we discarded those misconceptions about addiction, only to come up with another: the idea that addiction was about drugs.  We may have thought addiction meant a physical habit, believing any drug that didn’t produce physical habituation was not “addictive.”  Or we thought the drugs we took were causing all our problems. We thought that merely getting rid of the drugs would restore sanity to our lives.

One of the most important lessons we learn in Narcotics Anonymous is that addiction is much more than the drugs we used.  Addiction is a part of us; it’s an illness that involves every area of our lives, with or without drugs.  We can see its effects on our thoughts, our feelings, and our behavior, even after we stop using.  Because of this, we need a solution that works to repair every area of our lives: the Twelve Steps.

––––=––––

Just for today:  Addiction is not a simple disease, but it has a simple solution.  Today, I will live in that solution: the Twelve Steps of recovery.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 14, 2014, 01:48:57 PM »
WORD FOR THE DAY
Sunday, Dec. 14
We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
Joseph Campbell
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 14, 2014, 01:48:05 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote      12/14/14


There is no completion for the circle of recovery. A circle has no beginning and no end. It is suggested that recovery begins when you have learned enough from those before you and pass it along to those behind. Love is the process that keeps the circle moving.

Standing hand in hand or arm in arm after a meeting I absorb the love that travels our circle of recovery.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on December 14, 2014, 01:46:29 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day         December 14,2014
"Male and female is fundamental to life; partners in work to be done."   
--Oren R. Lyons, Spokesman, Traditional Circle of Elders
The Great Spirit created a system which would allow us to reproduce, to have companionship, to love, to laugh, to cry, and be happy. Man and Woman each have gifts the other doesn't have. But, together they have these gifts to share with each other. The Great Spirit made it this way. So let us treat each other with respect. Let us look upon each other in a sacred way.
Grandfather, Grandmother, bring the spirits to teach us.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on December 14, 2014, 01:43:50 PM »
Sunday, December 14, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Clear Thinking

Strive for clear thinking. Many of us have had our thinking clouded by denial. Some of us have even lost faith in ourselves because we've spent a degree of time in denial. But losing faith in our thinking isn't going to help us. What we need to lose faith in is denial.

We didn't resort to denial - either of someone else's problem or our own - because we were deficient. Denial, the shock absorber for the soul, protects us until we are equipped to cope with reality.

Clear thinking and recovery don't mean we will never resort to denial. Denial is the first step toward acceptance, and for most of our life, we will be striving to accept something.

Clear thinking means we don't allow ourselves to become immersed in negativity or unrealistic expectations. We stay connected to other recovering people. We go to our meetings, where peace of mind and realistic support are available. We work the Steps, pray, and meditate.

We keep our thinking on track by asking our Higher Power to help us think clearly - not by expecting Him, or someone else, to do our thinking for us.

Today, I will strive for balanced, clear thought in all areas of my life.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 13, 2014, 01:02:14 PM »

December 13 , 2014

Membership

“There is only one requirement for membership, the desire to stop using.”

Basic Text, p. 9

––––=––––

We all know people who could benefit from Narcotics Anonymous.  Many people we encounter from all walks of life—our family members, old friends, and coworkers—could really use a program of recovery in their lives.  Sadly, those who need us don’t always find their way to our rooms.

NA is a program of attraction, not promotion.  We are only members when we say we are.  We can bring our friends and loved ones to a meeting if they are willing, but we cannot force them to embrace the way of life that has given us freedom from active addiction.

Membership in Narcotics Anonymous is a highly personal decision.  The choice to become a member is made in the heart of each individual addict.  In the long run, coerced meeting attendance doesn’t keep too many addicts in our rooms.  Only addicts who are still suffering, if given the opportunity, can decide if they are powerless over their addiction.  We can carry the message, but we can’t carry the addict.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I am grateful for my decision to become a member of Narcotics Anonymous.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on December 13, 2014, 01:00:40 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote      12/13/14


At the start of meeting we always ask, 'Is there anybody new or coming back?' We should also ask, 'Is there anybody old and going out?

I remember that the 'still suffering alcoholic' can include old timers too!
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on December 13, 2014, 12:59:11 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day            December 13, 2014
"In our language there is no word to say inferior or superiority or equality because we are equal; it's a known fact. But life has become very complicated since the newcomers came here. And how does your spirit react to it?. It's painful. You have to be strong to walk through the storm. I know I'm a bridge between two worlds. All I ask is for people to wash their feet before they try to walk on me."   
--Alanis Obomsawin, ABENAKI
For native people who speak their language, English can be very confusing. Many times you cannot express in English the true meaning of Indian words. When we hear something in English we sometimes react or our spirit reacts. Sometimes we need to use English words out of order to express our true meanings. We need to be patient and pray. Living in two worlds can be difficult. Life is painful sometimes. The pain of life is where the lessons are learned.
Creator, let me learn the lessons You have taught my people.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go.
« Last post by CD on December 13, 2014, 12:57:08 PM »
Saturday, December 13, 2014
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Giving

Don't be afraid of giving.

For a while, we may need to back off from giving as we learn to discern the difference between healthy giving and caretaking, which leave us feeling victimized and others feeling resentful.

This is a temporary spot.

To be healthy, to do our part in this spiritual way of life, to be part of the endless cycle of the Universe, guided by our Creator, we need to give and receive.

Both parts are important.

What is healthy giving?

This is a fine lined behavior each of us must seek to understand for ourselves. It is giving that feels good and does not leave us feeling victimized.

It is giving that holds the giver and the receiver in high esteem.

It is giving based on a desire to do it rather than from a sense of guilt, pity, shame, or obligation.

It is giving with no strings attached. Or it is giving based on a clean, direct contract.

Whether it is giving our time, efforts, energy, comfort, nurturing, money, or ourselves, it is giving that we can afford.

Giving is part of the chain of giving and receiving. We can learn to give in healthy ways; we can learn to give in love. We need to keep an eye on our giving, to make sure it has not crossed the line into caretaking. But we need to learn to give in ways that work for us and others.

Today, God, guide me in my giving. Help me give to others in healthy ways. Help me give what feels right, what feels good, what feels clean, and what I can afford.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on December 12, 2014, 04:13:37 PM »
December 12

Fear of change

“By working the steps, we come to accept a Higher Power’s will....  We lose our fear of the unknown.  We are set free.”

Basic Text, p. 16

––––=––––

Life is a series of changes, both large and small.  Although we may know and accept this fact intellectually, chances are that our initial emotional reaction to change is fear.  For some reason, we assume that each and every change is going to hurt, causing us to be miserable.

If we look back on the changes that have happened in our lives, we’ll find that most of them have been for the best.  We were probably very frightened at the prospect of life without drugs, yet it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to us.  Perhaps we’ve lost a job that we thought we’d die without, but later on we found greater challenge and personal fulfillment in a new career.  As we venture forth in our recovery, we’re likely to experience more changes.  We will outgrow old situations and become ready for new ones.

With all sorts of changes taking place, it’s only natural to grab hold of something, anything familiar and try to hold on.  Solace can be found in a Power greater than ourselves.  The more we allow changes to happen at the direction of our Higher Power, the more we’ll trust that those changes are for the best.  Faith will replace fear, and we’ll know in our hearts that all will be well.

––––=––––

Just for today:  When I am afraid of a change in my life, I will take comfort from knowing that God’s will for me is good.


Copyright © 1991-2014 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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