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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on March 23, 2015, 04:43:39 PM »

March 23 , 2015

God’s gifts

“We do the footwork and accept what’s being given to us freely on a daily basis.”

Basic Text, p. 47

––––=––––

Our relationship with our Higher Power is a two-way street.  In prayer, we speak and God listens.  When we meditate, we do our best to listen for the will of our Higher Power.  We know that we are responsible for our part of the relationship.  If we do not pray and listen, we shut our Higher Power out of our lives.

When we think about our relationship with our Higher Power, it’s important to remember which one we are: the powerless one.  We can ask for guidance; we can ask for willingness or strength; we can ask for knowledge of our Higher Power’s will—but we cannot make demands.  The God of our understanding—the one with the power—will fulfill that half of the relationship by giving us exactly what we need, when we need it.

We need to take action every day to keep our relationship with a Higher Power alive.  One way we do this is by applying the Eleventh Step.  Then we remember our own powerlessness and accept the will of a Power greater than ourselves.

––––=––––

Just for today:  In my relationship with my Higher Power, I am the powerless one.  Remembering who I am, today I will humbly accept the gifts of the God I understand.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on March 23, 2015, 04:42:23 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote    3/23/15


Listen to the message, not the messenger! This is what Tradition Twelve is all about, looking past the personality to the principle behind the message. There are some mighty slick personalities out there talking trash and some Big Book thumpers (irritating as they are) that have a true message of hope.

The slicker, the sicker.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on March 23, 2015, 04:40:57 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day      March 23 , 2015
"We must relearn how to cry. A strong man cries; it is the weak man who holds back his tears."   
--Archie Fire Lame Deer, LAKOTA
Indian men and other men should really meditate on this Elder's saying. So many men have been taught it is unmanly to cry, to show emotions or to feel. When people cry, the Elders say there are two types of tears � one type will taste salty; the other type will taste sweet. One is caused by pain, and the other is caused by the release from the pain, or joy tears. A strong man knows himself and knows his relationship with the Great Spirit. The release of tears is a spiritual act. Our bodies are designed to cry. We should honor our bodies and use them as the Creator intended.
Great Spirit, Grandfather, today, teach me to cry.
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Monday, March 23, 2015
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Flack from Setting Boundaries

We need to know how far we'll go, and how far we'll allow others to go with us. Once we understand this, we can go anywhere.
—Beyond Codependency

When we own our power to take care of ourselves - set a boundary, say no, and change an old pattern - we may get flack from some people. That's okay. We don't have to let their reactions control us, stop us, or influence our decision to take care of ourselves.

We don't have to control their reactions to our process of self-care. That is not our responsibility. We don't have to expect them not to react either.

People will react when we do things differently or take assertive action to nurture ourselves, particularly if our decision in some way affects them. Let them have their feelings. Let them have their reactions. But continue on your course anyway.

If people are used to us behaving in a certain way, they'll attempt to convince us to stay that way to avoid changing the system. If people are used to us saying yes all the time, they may start mumbling and murmuring when we say no. If people are used to us taking care of their responsibilities, feelings, and problems, they may give us some flack when we stop. That's normal. We can learn to live with a little flack in the name of healthy self-care. Not abuse, mind you flack.

If people are used to controlling us through guilt, bullying, and badgering, they may intensify their efforts when we change and refuse to be controlled. That's okay. That's flack too.

We don't have to let flack pull us back into old ways if we've decided we want and need to change. We don't have to react to flack or give it much attention. It doesn't deserve it. It will die down.

Today, I will disregard any flack I receive for changing my behaviors or making other efforts to be myself.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on March 22, 2015, 03:25:03 PM »

March 22 , 2015

The principle of self-support

“In our addiction, we were dependent upon people, places, and things.  We looked to them to support us and supply the things we found lacking in ourselves.”

Basic Text, pp. 70-71

––––=––––

In the animal kingdom, there is a creature that thrives on others.  It is called a leech.  It attaches itself to people and takes what it needs.  When one victim brushes the leech off, it simply goes to the next.

In our active addiction, we behaved similarly.  We drained our families, our friends, and our communities.  Consciously or unconsciously, we sought to get something for nothing from virtually everyone we encountered.

When we saw the basket passed at our first meeting we may have thought, “Self-support!  Now what kind of odd notion is this?”  As we watched, we noticed something.  These self-supporting addicts were free.  By paying their own way, they had earned the privilege of making their own decisions.

By applying the principle of self-support in our personal lives, we gain for ourselves the same kind of freedom.  No longer does anyone have the right to tell us where to live, because we pay our own rent.  We can eat, wear, or drive whatever we choose, because we provide it for ourselves.

Unlike the leech, we don’t have to depend on others for our sustenance.  The more responsibility we assume, the more freedom we’ll gain.

––––=––––

Just for today:  There are no limits to the freedom I can earn by supporting myself.  I will accept personal responsibility and pay my own way today.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote
« Last post by CD on March 22, 2015, 03:23:49 PM »
Pocket Sponsor - Book - Quote     3/22/15


'It is time to speak your Truth. Create your community. Be good to each other. And do not look outside yourself for the leader. This could be a good time!'
Oraibi, Arizona Hopi Nation

I enjoy the Fellowship of the Spirit.
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Elder's Meditation of the Day
« Last post by CD on March 22, 2015, 03:22:52 PM »
Elder's Meditation of the Day         March 22, 2015
"Everything's so simple, and we make everything so complicated. That's why we're confused."   
--Vickie Downey, TEWA/Tesuque Pueblo
The Creator designed a very simple set of Laws for us to follow. If we follow these simple things, we'll be happy. If we don't follow these simple things, our lives become complicated. For example:
Respect Mother Earth
Love one another
Be truthful
Give to your brother and sisters
Be gentle with each other
Be happy
Following these simple Laws will have great rewards.

Great Spirit, let me lead a simple life.
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Sunday, March 22, 2015
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Letting Go of Being a Victim

It's okay to have a good day. Really.

It's okay to be doing okay and to feel like our life is manageable and on track.

Many of us have learned, as part of our survival behaviors, that the way to get the attention and approval we want is to be victims. If life is awful, too difficult, unmanageable, too hard, unfair, then others will accept, like, and approve of us, we think.

We may have learned this from living and associating with people who also learned to survive by being a victim.

We are not victims. We do not need to be victimized. We do not need to be helpless and out of control to get the attention and love we desire. In fact, the kind of love we are seeking cannot be obtained that way.

We can get the love we really want and need by only owning our power. We learn that we can stand on our own two feet, even though it sometimes feels good to lean a little. We learn that the people we are leaning on are not holding us up. They are standing next to us.

We all have bad days -- days when things are not going the way we'd like, days when we have feelings of sadness and fear. But we can deal with our bad days and darker feelings in ways that reflect self-responsibility rather than victimization.

It's okay to have a good day too. We might not have as much to talk about, but we'll have more to enjoy.

God, help me let go of my need to be a victim. Help me let go of my belief that to be loved and get attention I need to be a victim. Surround me with people who love me when I own my power. Help me start having good days and enjoying them.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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Meditations and ponderings / Re: Just For Today
« Last post by CD on March 21, 2015, 02:22:43 PM »
March 21 , 2015

A treatable illness

“Addiction is a disease that involves more than the use of drugs.”

Basic Text, p. 3

––––=––––

At our first meeting, we may have been taken aback at the way members shared about how the disease of addiction had affected their lives.  We thought to ourselves, “Disease?  I’ve just got a drug problem!  What in the world are they talking about?”

After some time in the program, we began to see that our addiction ran deeper than our obsessive, compulsive drug use.  We saw that we suffered from a chronic illness that affected many areas of our lives.  We didn’t know where we’d “caught” this disease, but in examining ourselves we realized that it had been present in us for many years.

Just as the disease of addiction affects every area of our lives, so does the NA program.  We attend our first meeting with all the symptoms present: the spiritual void, the emotional agony, the powerlessness, the unmanageability.

Treating our illness involves much more than mere abstinence.  We use the Twelve Steps, and though they don’t “cure” our illness, they do begin to heal us.  And as we recover, we experience the gift of life.

––––=––––

Just for today:  I will treat my illness with the Twelve Steps.

Copyright © 1991-2015 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
30
Saturday, March 21, 2015
You are reading from the book The Language of Letting Go
Considering Commitment

Pay attention to your commitments.

While many of us fear committing, it's good to weigh the cost of any commitment we are considering. We need to feel consistently positive that it's an appropriate commitment for us.

Many of us have a history of jumping -- leaping headfirst -- into commitments without weighing the cost and the possible consequences of that particular commitment. When we get in, we find that we do not really want to commit and feel trapped.

Some of us may become afraid of losing out on a particular opportunity if we don't commit. It is true that we will lose out on certain opportunities if we are unwilling to commit. We still need to weigh the commitment. We still need to become clear about whether that commitment seems right for us. If it isn't, we need to be direct and honest with others and ourselves.

Be patient. Do some soul searching. Wait for a clear answer. We need to make our commitments not in urgency or panic but in quiet confidence that what we are committing to is right for us.

If something within says no, find the courage to trust that voice.

This is not our last chance. It is not the only opportunity we'll ever have. Don't panic. We don't have to commit to what isn't right for us, even if we try to tell ourselves it should be right for us and we should commit.

Often, we can trust our intuitive sense more than we can trust our intellect about commitments.

In the excitement of making a commitment and beginning, we may overlook the realities of the middle. That is what we need to consider.

We don't have to commit out of urgency, impulsivity, or fear. We are entitled to ask, Will this be good for me? We are entitled to ask if this commitment feels right.

Today, God, guide me in making my commitments. Help me say yes to what is in my highest good, and no to what isn't. I will give serious consideration before I commit myself to any activity or person. I will take the time to consider if the commitment is really what I want.
From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.
 
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